EWART OAKESHOTT PDF

Biography[ edit ] Ronald Ewart Oakeshott was born in His uncle Jeffery Farnol wrote romance novels and swashbucklers and also had a collection of antique swords and through these the young Oakeshott became interested in swords. He worked at the Carlton Studios and at A. Johnson Ltd as a commercial artist. At this time in the s and s antique swords could still be picked up cheaply and Oakeshott began collecting them. Because of the scarcity of information about these he began to research them himself.

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Biography[ edit ] Ronald Ewart Oakeshott was born in His uncle Jeffery Farnol wrote romance novels and swashbucklers and also had a collection of antique swords and through these the young Oakeshott became interested in swords. He worked at the Carlton Studios and at A. Johnson Ltd as a commercial artist. At this time in the s and s antique swords could still be picked up cheaply and Oakeshott began collecting them.

Because of the scarcity of information about these he began to research them himself. As a trained artist he illustrated most of his own books and also became a speaker on arms and armour. He returned to A. Johnson, Ltd. In he met the educationist and writer Sybil Marshall at a dance. He co-founded the Arms and Armour Society in Oakeshott served as President of the Society in As a result, Oakeshott began to be consulted by museums such as the Fitzwilliam Museum at Cambridge and private collectors.

His second wife, the novelist Sybil Marshall — , survived him, along with a son and two daughters from his first marriage. At his death, Oakeshott bequeathed his personal collection of more than 75 swords, including many of historical significance, to the Oakeshott Institute of Arms and Armour in Minneapolis , an educational organisation dedicated to youth outreach, and "promoting the interest in ancient arms and armour through hands-on educational experience.

Though his work was not entirely original, it was certainly groundbreaking. Jan Peterson had previously developed a typology for Viking swords consisting of twenty-six categories. This simplified typology was then slightly expanded by Oakeshott by the addition of two transitional types into its current nine categories Types I—IX.

His typology traced the functional evolution of European swords over a period of five centuries, starting with the late Iron Age Type X, and took into consideration many factors: the shape of blades in cross section, profile taper, fullering, whether blades were stiff and pointed for thrusting or broad and flexible for cutting, etc. This was a breakthrough. He listed the weights and measurements of many swords in his collection which have become the basis for further academic work as well as templates for the creation of high quality modern replicas.

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The Oakeshott Institute

May I take this opportunity to join with others in remembering Ewart. I first became professionally involved with arms and armour in and very soon found myself in communication with Ewart on various matters, particularly medieval swords. He encouraged me in my work from the start and I first met Ewart in early , at the second Park Lane arms fair, London. Together with my wife, we were wined and dined and, like many entertained by Ewart and Sybil, were made most welcome.

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Ewart Oakeshott

This varies from blades of constant taper, the edges of which are straight and narrow to a point, to blades devoid of taper, the edges of which are parallel and finish in a rounded point. A fuller is a groove that runs down the middle of a blade, designed to lighten the weapon. This was inspired by his observation that many blades bearing inscriptions and crests had to be oriented this way to be read correctly. At the top, variants of the diamond shape.

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