AMS 5659 SPECIFICATION PDF

Stainless Steel - Precipitation Hardening - AMS AMS Precipitation hardening stainless steels are chromium and nickel containing steels that provide an optimum combination of the properties of martensitic and austenitic grades. Like martensitic grades, they are known for their ability to gain high strength through heat treatment and they also have the corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel. The high tensile strengths of precipitation hardening stainless steels come after a heat treatment process that leads to precipitation hardening of a martensitic or austenitic matrix. Hardening is achieved through the addition of one or more of the elements Copper, Aluminium, Titanium, Niobium, and Molybdenum.

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Stainless Steel - Precipitation Hardening - AMS AMS Precipitation hardening stainless steels are chromium and nickel containing steels that provide an optimum combination of the properties of martensitic and austenitic grades.

Like martensitic grades, they are known for their ability to gain high strength through heat treatment and they also have the corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel. The high tensile strengths of precipitation hardening stainless steels come after a heat treatment process that leads to precipitation hardening of a martensitic or austenitic matrix.

Hardening is achieved through the addition of one or more of the elements Copper, Aluminium, Titanium, Niobium, and Molybdenum. The most well known precipitation hardening steel is PH. After machining or another fabrication method, a single, low temperature heat treatment can be applied to increase the strength of the steel.

This is known as ageing or age-hardening. As it is carried out at low temperature, the component undergoes no distortion. Characterisation Precipitation hardening steels are characterised into one of three groups based on their final microstructures after heat treatment.

The three types are: martensitic e. Upon cooling to room temperature, they undergo a transformation that changes the austenite to martensite.

Semi-austenitic Alloys Unlike martensitic precipitation hardening steels, annealed semi-austenitic precipitation hardening steels are soft enough to be cold worked. Semi-austenitc steels retain their austenitic structure at room temperature but will form martensite at very low temperatures.

Austenitic Alloys Austenitic precipitation hardening steels retain their austenitic structure after annealing and hardening by ageing.

It remains in solution during rapid cooling. This increases the hardness and strength of the material. Hardness remains lower than that for martensitic or semi-austenitic precipitation hardening steels. Austenitic alloys remain nonmagnetic. Strength Yield strengths for precipitation-hardening stainless steels are to MPa.

Tensile strengths range from to MPa. Cold working before ageing can be used to facilitate even higher strengths. Chemical Composition.

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AMS 5659 SPECIFICATION PDF

They have a better combination of strength and corrosion resistance than when compared with the heat treatable series martensitic alloys. Corrosion resistance is similar to that found in grade stainless steel. Fabrication This grade has good forming characteristics Machinability This grade has reasonable machinability Heat Treatment The key to the properties of precipitation hardening stainless steels lies in heat treatment. As this treatment is carried out at a low temperature, no distortion occurs and there is only superficial discolouration. During the hardening process a slight decrease in size takes place.

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